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» Personal Loan No Credit Check, Online Economics » Station London Underground » Topics begins with S » Seven Sisters (station)


Page modified: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 15:53:54

Seven Sisters is the name of a station and a station London Underground in the urban district London Borough OF Haringey. The suburban traffic turntable, which is served by courses of the Victoria LINE and the railway company one, lies in the Travelcard Tarifzone 3, between the main streets Seven Sisters Road and west Green Road. In the year 2004 used 10.034 million passengers the traffic junction.

The station is designated after the "Seven Sisters" (seven sisters), a salient group of trees. The railway operates aboveground, the underground underground. On the way to the next subway railway station Tottenham resounds branches a tunnel, which leads to the depot Northumberland park. This lies with the station of the same name at the railway main route to Cambridge.

The station was opened in 22 July 1872 by the Great Eastern Railway, in the context of the start-up of the suburb distance between Hackney and Enfield. On 1 January 1878 the Palace in such a way specified gate line followed. This had developed for a popular trip goal in competition to a distance of the Great Northern Railway and led into the proximity of the Alexandra Palace. British Rail stopped the passenger traffic in the course of rationalization measures on this distance on 7 January 1963. The platforms in Seven Sisters, belonging to it, were torn off, the tracks were removed.

On 1 September 1968 the first section of the Victoria LINE between Walthamstow cent ral and Islington was opened. The change of the station, which received an additional entrance, could be terminated however only in December 1968.

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